Occupying Krakow

Poland’s history forever changed on 1 September 1939 when Nazi Germany invaded its western border.  On 6 September, the troops of the Third Reich reached Krakow and the city was quickly established as the capital of the Nazi’s “General Government,” a colonial authority under the leadership of Hans Frank.  In less than a week, the city of Krakow was officially occupied.  The Germans dismantled many statues in Krakow’s historical center, they “Germanized” street names, set a curfew for the Poles, and within six months, created a Jewish Ghetto.  Today, most of Krakow has been returned to its former glory – street signs are once again in Polish and some of the important monuments were rebuilt, but pieces of Krakow’s brutal past still linger.  To commemorate the city’s history, a portion of the Ghetto wall still stands and nearby, the city commissioned a new memorial to honor the Jews who perished within its walls.  Oskar Schindler’s (from the famed movie Schindler’s List) factory still stands in the same place, although it now serves as a (wonderful!) museum explaining the occupation of Krakow.  Bobby and I spent three lovely days in this wonderful city – walking the streets, visiting its museums, and eating some pretty spectacular Polish fare.  … [Read More]